Welcome To
Drossman Gastroenterology

Douglas A Drossman, MD, former co-Director of the UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders is seeing patients at Drossman
Gastroenterology PLLC located at Sutton Station, 5826 Fayetteville Road, Suite 201, Durham, NC 27713.

Drossman Gastroenterology PLLC will maintain the same biopsychosocial patient centered care model that Dr. Drossman used while at UNC. The practice is located within a multidisciplinary health care center that can provide other health care services. He is joined by a nurse practitioner (NP) Ms. Jessica DeMotts. The clinic is held on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Most all laboratory and other diagnostic studies are available through the new health care facility.

Payment to Drossman Gastroenterology is by cash, check or credit card at the time of the visit. Proper forms are provided if you choose to file for reimbursement. Unfortunately we are not able to accept Medicare. The physician fee is competitive with the combined physician and hospital fee charges now occurring at UNC Health Care.

Appointments for new patients

If you are coming to see Dr. Drossman for the first time, a referral from your primary care physician or gastroenterologist may be needed. You or your doctor should contact our office and we will work with you to set up the appointment and provide information on local resources if you are coming from out of state.

Contact Us

Spotlight

Our Philosophy

Drossman Gastroenterology is helping patients with difficult to diagnose and treat functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders. We also seek to enhance the physician/patient relationship and improve clinical outcomes by maintaining fundamental values of listening actively, providing patient centered care, and collaborating in treatment.

I spent two weeks at the Drossman Center of Biopsychosocial Care in Chapel Hill. It was an amazing opportunity that Dr. Drossman first mentioned to me when he was a guest speaker at the Cleveland Clinic. It was a privilege to be able to visit the Center and learn from the experience. It was a unique clinic with a focus on patient care and outcomes. I learned a great deal from observing patient-physician visits/interactions, reading articles and gaining familiarity with the medications used for functional GI disorders. I also spent time with Dr. Burnett, psychologist specializing in GI disorders and learned about his approach to managing GI patients. An excellent experience overall and beautiful Center!

Samita Garg, MD – Staff, Division of Gastroenterology

Digestive Disease & Surgery Institute Cleveland Clinic Foundation

DrossmanCare
2019-08-06T11:34:15-04:00

Samita Garg, MD – Staff, Division of Gastroenterology

Digestive Disease & Surgery Institute Cleveland Clinic Foundation

I spent two weeks at the Drossman Center of Biopsychosocial Care in Chapel Hill. It was an amazing opportunity that Dr. Drossman first mentioned to me when he was a guest speaker at the Cleveland Clinic. It was a privilege to be able to visit the Center and learn from the experience. It was a unique clinic with a focus on patient care and outcomes. I learned a great deal from observing patient-physician visits/interactions, reading articles and gaining familiarity with the medications used for functional GI disorders. I also spent time with Dr. Burnett, psychologist specializing in GI disorders and learned about his approach to managing GI patients. An excellent experience overall and beautiful Center!
I saw Dr. Drossman after suffering for months with abdominal pain. He was compassionate, listened to my story, and explained treatment plans clearly to me. Last year, I was weak, in pain, and struggling to work and care for my daughter. This year, I can eat almost anything and have no abdominal pain. I am able to work, care for my daughter, and have been able to re-enroll in graduate classes. Highly recommend!

Beth C-W., Patient

DrossmanCare
2019-08-09T10:55:43-04:00

Beth C-W., Patient

I saw Dr. Drossman after suffering for months with abdominal pain. He was compassionate, listened to my story, and explained treatment plans clearly to me. Last year, I was weak, in pain, and struggling to work and care for my daughter. This year, I can eat almost anything and have no abdominal pain. I am able to work, care for my daughter, and have been able to re-enroll in graduate classes. Highly recommend!
…your agreeing to collaborate with me has been one of the great moments in my life as well. Your career has been a wonderful contribution to so many doctors, so many patients. Congratulations on a life well-lived. Stay healthy and keep working for another 20 years. Unless you want to go back to your rock band (I just started guitar lessons several months ago-no music background before-and I love it).”

Dr. Harley Sobin, Gastroenterologist, retired

DrossmanCare
2019-08-09T11:02:53-04:00

Dr. Harley Sobin, Gastroenterologist, retired

…your agreeing to collaborate with me has been one of the great moments in my life as well. Your career has been a wonderful contribution to so many doctors, so many patients. Congratulations on a life well-lived. Stay healthy and keep working for another 20 years. Unless you want to go back to your rock band (I just started guitar lessons several months ago-no music background before-and I love it).”
Doug has made major contributions to our understanding of how to help patients whose clinical problems are not easily diagnosed or managed with the endoscope or with other diagnostic or interventional techniques. In fact, his talent and influence in this area have been so profound that UNC students, residents, fellows and indeed faculty, see him as the person to go to when they need help.

M. Andrew Greganti, MD, Vice Chair, Medicine

UNC School of Medicine

DrossmanCare
2019-08-09T11:04:16-04:00

M. Andrew Greganti, MD, Vice Chair, Medicine

UNC School of Medicine

Doug has made major contributions to our understanding of how to help patients whose clinical problems are not easily diagnosed or managed with the endoscope or with other diagnostic or interventional techniques. In fact, his talent and influence in this area have been so profound that UNC students, residents, fellows and indeed faculty, see him as the person to go to when they need help.
Few academicians in medicine have had such an impact as Doug. His ability to teach and demonstrate patient interview skills and the physician-patient relationship are legendary and have educated physicians, residents and students all over the world. His studies of the bio-psycho-social impact and its role in functional gastrointestinal diseases represent landmark publications. The creation of the Rome Foundation and criteria has revolutionized the categorization, diagnosis and treatment of functional GI diseases. These are but a few of his accomplishments. Doug tells me that he considers me one of his mentors. I hope that is so, because I have been proud, and I might say, quick, to claim this role also so that I could also bask in his glory. However, I have reminded him that when he started the afterhours, problem patient conferences some 30 years ago (and I understand that they still go on today), I was one of the inaugural attendees. Doug taught me, his Division Director, how to interview and manage patients. I still employ what he taught me. So I salute him today, not as a mentor, but as a mentee.

Don Powell, MD, Former Chief of GI at UNC
UNC

DrossmanCare
2019-08-09T11:17:25-04:00

Don Powell, MD, Former Chief of GI at UNC
UNC

Few academicians in medicine have had such an impact as Doug. His ability to teach and demonstrate patient interview skills and the physician-patient relationship are legendary and have educated physicians, residents and students all over the world. His studies of the bio-psycho-social impact and its role in functional gastrointestinal diseases represent landmark publications. The creation of the Rome Foundation and criteria has revolutionized the categorization, diagnosis and treatment of functional GI diseases. These are but a few of his accomplishments. Doug tells me that he considers me one of his mentors. I hope that is so, because I have been proud, and I might say, quick, to claim this role also so that I could also bask in his glory. However, I have reminded him that when he started the afterhours, problem patient conferences some 30 years ago (and I understand that they still go on today), I was one of the inaugural attendees. Doug taught me, his Division Director, how to interview and manage patients. I still employ what he taught me. So I salute him today, not as a mentor, but as a mentee.
During the summer of 2010 I had the pleasure of joining Dr Drossman in his clinic for a month. For me it was truly a “masters class” and an experience I would always cherish. Naturally before I came to NC I was aware of Dr Drossman’s work in the field of functional GI disorders but being able to participate in a “live performance” (and it is indeed a performance) was a profound experience for me both personally and professionally. The way he is implementing the “Biopsychosocial model theory” into the most complicated cases in the GI practice is truly the “art of medicine”. There is not a single day since that I am not using a fraction of what I have learned from him. I know that watching him at work made me a better care giver for my patients and for that I am very grateful. I would like to take this opportunity to wish him all the best in his future plans and encourage him to stay restless, productive and innovative as he has always been.

Roy Dekel, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine

Ichilov Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel

DrossmanCare
2019-08-09T11:19:32-04:00

Roy Dekel, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine

Ichilov Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel

During the summer of 2010 I had the pleasure of joining Dr Drossman in his clinic for a month. For me it was truly a “masters class” and an experience I would always cherish. Naturally before I came to NC I was aware of Dr Drossman’s work in the field of functional GI disorders but being able to participate in a “live performance” (and it is indeed a performance) was a profound experience for me both personally and professionally. The way he is implementing the “Biopsychosocial model theory” into the most complicated cases in the GI practice is truly the “art of medicine”. There is not a single day since that I am not using a fraction of what I have learned from him. I know that watching him at work made me a better care giver for my patients and for that I am very grateful. I would like to take this opportunity to wish him all the best in his future plans and encourage him to stay restless, productive and innovative as he has always been.
Doug has had an enormously positive influence on me in several ways. He has been a wonderful mentor who has always had my best interest in mind. Seeing patients with him in his clinic gave me a completely different perspective on taking care of patients. He taught me how to establish a positive, interactive relationship with patients, actively listen, empower patients, and to value patience. He also taught me that active listening can be very therapeutic for patients. Doug has guided me in working effectively in leadership positions on the Rome Board and Functional Brain-Gut Group. He always makes himself available and is happy to help others. Doug has been a wonderful role model for me. He is a leader and icon in the field of functional gastrointestinal disorders. I feel extremely fortunate to call Doug my mentor, colleague and good friend.

Lin Chang, MD

Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women’s Health

DrossmanCare
2019-08-09T11:22:20-04:00

Lin Chang, MD

Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women’s Health

Doug has had an enormously positive influence on me in several ways. He has been a wonderful mentor who has always had my best interest in mind. Seeing patients with him in his clinic gave me a completely different perspective on taking care of patients. He taught me how to establish a positive, interactive relationship with patients, actively listen, empower patients, and to value patience. He also taught me that active listening can be very therapeutic for patients. Doug has guided me in working effectively in leadership positions on the Rome Board and Functional Brain-Gut Group. He always makes himself available and is happy to help others. Doug has been a wonderful role model for me. He is a leader and icon in the field of functional gastrointestinal disorders. I feel extremely fortunate to call Doug my mentor, colleague and good friend.

I wish more doctors understood the significance of Gut-Brain interaction, especially those in the field of gastroenterology. How can you study the digestive system and not take into account the two major organs that are hard wired with bi-directional communication?  The absence of this knowledge coupled with a dualistic model failed me as a patient and robbed me of ten very precious years of my life.


In 2009, my normal, healthy and happy life took a drastic turn into a decade of endless testing, endless pain, and endless expenses with no answers and no hope. My GI symptoms were initially mild and probiotics seemed to do the trick. But add on sinus infections, bronchitis, repeated antibiotics, and unmanaged stress - my symptoms became severe.   I desperately wanted wellness – for myself and my family.  Local doctors could not explain my symptoms, and dozens of tests showed that everything was “normal.”  I repeatedly echoed the sentiments of Johanna Ruddy: “I AM IN PAIN. WHAT’S WRONG WITH ME? WHY CAN’T SOMEONE HELP ME.”  While I was never suicidal, I continually prayed, “Lord heal me, take me or sustain me.”  I remember telling my husband, “I can’t continue to live with this level of pain.”  I was discouraged, hopeless and miserable!


Repeated trips to three nationally recognized medical centers cost me thousands of dollars.  Typical GI tests were performed and dietary restrictions were recommended. A team of doctors at Mayo Clinic “found nothing wrong.” Weight loss of thirty pounds could not be explained.  One doctor told me to ignore my symptoms – like a pilot putting duct tape over the cock-pit controls.  They diagnosed me with “unintentional anorexia” and “health anxiety.” I was humiliated and lost all respect for the medical community.  If only they assigned the correct diagnosis and understood dysregulation of the brain-gut pathway.


For the next eight years, I floundered.  My pain was 24/7 - 365 - level 10! Looking back, I don’t know how I survived. I faked my way through raising three children and being a loving wife. I resorted to mental distraction at work as a coping mechanism because I had no other choice. But then in 2017, God answered my prayers of desperation and led me to a doctor in Charleston, SC who had studied under Dr. Drossman as a GI Fellow, at UNC-Chapel Hill.  In a single visit, after a short series of questions, this doctor accurately identified my illness, and referred me to Drossman Care.


I, and my family, are forever indebted and grateful to Dr. Drossman and the Rome Foundation for the magnitude of research done in the field of DGBI’s. Through the care and guidance of Dr. Drossman, I am thrilled to say, I HAVE MY LIFE BACK and I AM PAIN FREE.  Healing doesn’t happen overnight and for me, it was a process. It was important for me to acknowledge that years of misdiagnosis would take time to unravel – and the severity of my symptoms would require multiple layers of treatment. My first visit with Dr. Drossman set the stage for success. His methods of communication set me at ease and conveyed a sense of care and concern.  He educated me with diagrams and even gave me several journal articles which I happily read. I trusted Dr. Drossman -- perhaps the most critical step -- because without trust, there is no viable treatment plan.  Time invested in the Patient Doctor Relationship yielded a huge ROI!  And Dr. Drossman’s poop emoji pillow made me smile and definitely helped me let my guard down.


When I arrived at Drossman Care in 2017, I was stuck in a vicious cycle with no way out. An accurate diagnosis coupled with Rome Foundation Research paved the way for healing. My treatment included Pharmacology + CBT + Doctor’s Care + Time.  Neuromodulators were necessary to regulate signals to the brain. Equally, if not more important, CBT helped me identify and change behaviors that were hurtful and an impedance to healing.  Calm the brain, calm the gut! I wasn’t crazy, but my A-type, overachieving personality needed a total OVERHAUL. Today, my life is vastly improved, better balanced and even restful.  I am thankful that the biopsychosocial model not only saved my life but gave me a much better quality of life to enjoy!


Karen Salem

Patient

DrossmanCare
2020-10-16T10:08:48-04:00

Karen Salem

Patient

I wish more doctors understood the significance of Gut-Brain interaction, especially those in the field of gastroenterology. How can you study the digestive system and not take into account the two major organs that are hard wired with bi-directional communication?  The absence of this knowledge coupled with a dualistic model failed me as a patient and robbed me of ten very precious years of my life. In 2009, my normal, healthy and happy life took a drastic turn into a decade of endless testing, endless pain, and endless expenses with no answers and no hope. My GI symptoms were initially mild and probiotics seemed to do the trick. But add on sinus infections, bronchitis, repeated antibiotics, and unmanaged stress - my symptoms became severe.   I desperately wanted wellness – for myself and my family.  Local doctors could not explain my symptoms, and dozens of tests showed that everything was “normal.”  I repeatedly echoed the sentiments of Johanna Ruddy: “I AM IN PAIN. WHAT’S WRONG WITH ME? WHY CAN’T SOMEONE HELP ME.”  While I was never suicidal, I continually prayed, “Lord heal me, take me or sustain me.”  I remember telling my husband, “I can’t continue to live with this level of pain.”  I was discouraged, hopeless and miserable! Repeated trips to three nationally recognized medical centers cost me thousands of dollars.  Typical GI tests were performed and dietary restrictions were recommended. A team of doctors at Mayo Clinic “found nothing wrong.” Weight loss of thirty pounds could not be explained.  One doctor told me to ignore my symptoms – like a pilot putting duct tape over the cock-pit controls.  They diagnosed me with “unintentional anorexia” and “health anxiety.” I was humiliated and lost all respect for the medical community.  If only they assigned the correct diagnosis and understood dysregulation of...
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